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Aren't you glad Biden was the Democrat's nominee when you consider the other possibilities?

By Curt Anderson
August 11, 2021 8:58 am
Category: Government

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In 2020 there were many people who felt that Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, or Andrew Cuomo would be the best possible presidential nominees for the Democratic Party.

Even though no less a political savant than Donald Trump feared Joe Biden so much that he risked impeachment in an effort to stop him, many Democrats had doubts. They felt that Biden wouldn't be tough and energetic enough to take on Trump or have the necessary mental acuity in the debates.

Had either of the two senators won the presidential election by managing to pull an upset wins in Georgia and Arizona as Biden did, Mitch McConnell would be presiding over the Senate as majority leader. That is because the governors of Vermont and Massachusetts are both Republicans and they would have named replacement GOP senators for Warren and Sanders. So there would have no Senate passed infrastructure bill or budget resolution bill to help the poor and working people.

What if Cuomo had been the nominee? I shudder to think.



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Comments on "Aren't you glad Biden was the Democrat's nominee when you consider the other possibilities? ":

  1. by Donna on August 11, 2021 10:19 am
    I think we just ruined hts's day by coming out so strongly against Cuomo.


  2. by Curt Anderson on August 11, 2021 10:31 am
    Donna,
    There is an opinion piece in The Bulwark, that explains it all in its headline:
    Andrew Cuomo Resigned Because the Democrats Aren’t a Cult
    Normal political parties can police their own.


    thebulwark.com


  3. by HatetheSwamp on August 11, 2021 11:58 am

    Donna,

    These days, it seems to me, it'd be easier to stand by Nixon than Coumo.

    As I already have, I applaud the NY Dems for making it all but impossible to remain in office.

    Now, let's give a chance to Kathleen Willey and her gang and Tara Reade.


  4. by Donna on August 11, 2021 12:07 pm
    Outside of foreign policy, policy-wise Dick and Ike were the most liberal Republican presidents of my lifetime.


  5. by Donna on August 11, 2021 2:22 pm
    Cuomo will be gone soon, but the Swamp will remain intact.

    "Presiding over a massacre of elderly people and shielding the perpetrators all to ingratiate oneself with political financiers is now just regular politics. That’s now what politicians are allowed — and even expected — to do, everywhere. While President Biden’s former top aide lobbies the White House on behalf of the nursing home industry, the Biden Justice Department recently said it will not open an investigation into nursing home negligence and COVID-related deaths in New York and other states. Case closed.

    The nursing home massacre is just one of many examples of Cuomo lawlessness that should have elicited a law enforcement response — but didn’t. The Albany Times Union details eight other scandals that Cuomo presided over. And those don’t include other corrupt dealings, like giving his book publisher special tax breaks and funneling bond deals to his donors.

    On Tuesday, the New Yorker reported that Cuomo tried to strong-arm the Obama White House in 2014, to get the Justice Department to stop probing his decision to shut down an anti-corruption panel. Obama officials said nothing publicly about this for years, and decided only to speak their peace when Cuomo was unpopular and disempowered, so they would be safe from any blowback from MSNBC watchers and #TeamBlue enforcers.

    Up until the last few months, media outlets, Democratic politicians, and Democratic voters averted their eyes from Cuomo’s crime spree, instead seeing him as an idol to be worshiped, endorsed and supported as the great Cuomosexual future of the party.

    In light of his rampage, Cuomo leaving office only because of his grotesque sexual aggressions is not enough. Not even close. It’s good thing and the downfall is well-deserved — especially when sexual harassment, assault, and abuse are so pervasive and perpetrators are rarely punished. But the Cuomo misdeeds that remain unpunished also send a message about what we continue to tolerate — and that tolerance isn’t passive or accidental. It is deliberate.

    Punishing Cuomo for his corrupt dealings with nursing home and health care donors would scandalize similarly corrupt ties between these corporate interests and other politicians. For example: The health care lobby group that donated to Cuomo and drafted his nursing home immunity bill also funneled large sums of cash to New York Democratic legislators who passed that bill. And once that immunity bill was signed into law, Republican politicians then copied and pasted the language into their own state and federal bills, while raking in cash from health care interests.

    Prosecuting or impeaching a governor over such corruption could threaten this entire system of legalized bribery, which politicians of both parties benefit from. And so even as brave Democratic legislators such as Kim and state Senator Alessandra Biaggi tried to blow the whistle, that system effectively granted Cuomo the same immunity he gave to his nursing home industry donors, while thousands of elderly people perished. Impeachment and resignation only entered the discourse in response to his grotesque interpersonal behavior — in part because that could be portrayed as merely a problem of one bad apple in the barrel.

    The trouble is, we also have a barrel problem.

    We live in an era of politicians screaming “law and order,” while they champion corporate immunity, authorize ethics waivers, and oversee law enforcement machines that have reduced prosecutions of political corruption and white collar crime.

    This is a bipartisan affair — at the federal level, there’s a continuous theme from George W. Bush loading up his administration with corporate cronies, to Barack Obama refusing to prosecute a single banker involved in the financial crisis, to Donald Trump’s lawless rampage through Washington. On the I-95 corridor, it’s been the same bipartisan phenomenon in miniature — corruption scandals in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Massachusetts are the blue and red corners of the same quilt of corruption.

    This quilt is now over our head, suffocating our country — and Cuomo’s departure leaves its links intact. It’s great that Cuomo is leaving, but make no mistake: His legacy of lawlessness lives on, arguably stronger than ever — and it will continue to do so until voters start demanding something different."
    timesunion.com
    dailyposter.com


  6. by Curt Anderson on August 11, 2021 2:41 pm
    ...Barack Obama refusing to prosecute a single banker involved in the financial crisis... --Donna

    Donna,
    As we learned from Trump, a president shouldn't be the one ordering prosecutions or exonerations of individuals.

    Kareem Serageldin is a former executive at Credit Suisse. He is notable for being the only banker in the United States to be sentenced to jail time as a result of the financial crisis of 2007–2008, a conviction resulting from mismarking bond prices to hide losses.

    The banks have paid around $300 billion in fines relating to the Financial Crisis. I suspect that there were not more prosecutions of individual bankers because being greedy, unscrupulous and even unethical is not a crime.


  7. by Curt Anderson on August 11, 2021 2:56 pm
    his decision to shut down an anti-corruption panel. Obama officials said nothing publicly about this for years, and decided only to speak their peace when Cuomo was unpopular and disempowered... --Donna

    By Ronan Farrow
    In April, 2014, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo placed a call to the White House and reached Valerie Jarrett, a senior adviser to President Barack Obama. Cuomo was, as one official put it, “ranting and raving.” He had announced that he was shuttering the Moreland Commission, a group that he had convened less than a year earlier to root out corruption in New York politics. After Cuomo ended the group’s inquiries, Preet Bharara, then the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, issued letters instructing commissioners to preserve documents and had investigators from his office interview key witnesses. On the phone with Jarrett, Cuomo railed against Bharara. “This guy’s out of control,” a member of the White House legal team briefed on the call that day recalled Cuomo telling Jarrett. “He’s your guy.”

    Jarrett ended the conversation after only a few minutes. Any effort by the White House to influence investigations by a federal prosecutor could constitute criminal obstruction of justice. “He did, in fact, call me and raise concerns about the commission,” Jarrett told me. “As soon as he started talking, and I figured out what he was talking about, I shut down the conversation.” Although Cuomo fumed about Bharara’s efforts, he did not make any specific request before Jarrett ended the call. Nevertheless, Jarrett was alarmed and immediately walked to the office of the White House counsel, Kathryn Ruemmler, to report the conversation. Ruemmler agreed that the call was improper, and told Jarrett that she had acted correctly in ending the conversation without responding to Cuomo’s complaints. “I thought it was highly inappropriate,” the member of the White House’s legal team told me. “It was a stupid call for him to make.” Ruemmler reported the incident to the Deputy Attorney General, James M. Cole, who also criticized the call. “He shouldn’t have been doing that. He’s trying to exert political pressure on basically a prosecution or an investigation,” Cole told me. “So Cuomo trying to use whatever muscle he had with the White House to do it was a nonstarter and probably improper.”
    newyorker.com


  8. by Donna on August 11, 2021 3:17 pm
    As long as our court system regards corporations as people, money as speech, and there are in effect no limits to how much "speech" "people" can deliver to politicians and political parties, our government will always be steeped in corruption.


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