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▷ ▶ Problem Definition Flow chart SelectSmart.com free Education flowcharts and decision trees.
A SelectSmart.com Flowchart by Eran Raviv. See Eran Raviv's 4me blog page.
Viewed 283 times. Created October 2015.
This SelectSmart.com Education flowchart, a free online decision tool is a creation of Eran Raviv and for amusement purposes only. The implicit and explicit opinions expressed here are the author's. SelectSmart.com does not necessarily agree.
EducationProblem Definition Flow chart
By Eran Raviv
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This flowchart helps entrepreneurs fine tune their problem definition process.

                 
Square #1: Could this problem divide to smaller problems?
NO
Square #2: Does this problem statement include its solution?
NO
Square #3: Is the problem statement merely a symptom of the problem?
NO
Square #4: Is the problem definition actionable?
 

YES


YES


YES


NO

YES

Draw a flow chart that breaks the problem into sub-problems until you get to the problem you want to focus on. Then restate your problem in a manner it would be in its most granular state and go back to square #1
Write down what the explicit and implicit assumptions this problem definition rely on, then restate your problem in a manner it would focus on the problem and will not lean of a specific solution then go back to square #2
List other symptoms that may represent this problem, then restate your problem in a manner it would point to the problem rather than a symptom, then go back to square #1
Write down why hasn't the problem been solved by now. Restate your problem in a manner it would be actionable and solvable then go back to square #1
Square #5: Can a realistic solution be offered to your problem definition?








YES

NO
Square #9: Good Work! You're ready to go and start working on the solution!
YES
Square #8: Does the problem statement offer new information to potential solvers?
NO
Square #7: Is the problem statement is phrased in a professional Jargon?
YES
Square #6: Does the problem include a clear criteria for success?
What is the theory of change behind the problem? Restate your problem in a manner a realistic solution could be linked to its definition, then go back to square #4




NO


YES


NO

 
 
Try to extract important pieces of information that would be new and help potential solvers draw a solution to the problem.You can use relevant literature (papers, articles, research pieces, M&E reports etc) to do that effectively.Accordingly restate the problem definition and go back to square #7
Try to omit all Jargon words and read the problem definition out loud to someone who is not part of your professional community. Now restate the problem definition in a manner he will be able to relate to it and fully understand it, and go back to square #6
Try to think who is harmed by the issue you are facing. Write down a short and clear criteria for success for the problem, then restate your problem so it would include a criteria for success, then go back to square #4